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Starbucks Adds Cups, Tumblers and More Drinkware Ordering to Its App

Starbucks Adds Cups, Tumblers and More Drinkware Ordering to Its App



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So customers can pay ahead and swing by to pick it up

Wachiwit/Shutterstock

It might go without saying, but restaurants are a lot different now than they were before coronavirus began to spread in America. Many of us are placing our orders online for delivery or pickup to spend less time in stores. Perhaps due to that trend, Starbucks has added some of its merchandise for puchase on its mobile app.

Coronavirus Coffee Trends During Quarantine

That’s right, you can now purchase drinkware through the Starbucks app, so when you go to order your grande cold brew with soy and two pumps of vanilla, you’ll have a nice new cup waiting for you too.

To find the offerings, go to the order page on your app and scroll past drinks, food and at-home coffee until you come to drinkware. Once you click on that, you’ll find a mixture of water bottles, cold cups and tumblers. You can also buy a small Starbucks-branded brown paper shopping bag that appears to be free of charge with a purchase.

Exact items may vary by store, but if you’re in the market to safely pick up some order-ahead drinkware, now’s your time to shine. If you’re good on cups and you’re only interested in making barista-quality coffee from home, here are our best tips and recipes for a crave-worthy cup of joe.


Cup and Materials

We&rsquove offered a cup with 10% post-consumer recycled paper fiber since 2006, after developing and leading the industry to approve using recycled fiber for food packaging. And we keep working to decrease the materials used in our packaging, finding new ways to encourage reusables and implement recycling solutions for our cups. In 2012 we introduced the EarthSleeve&trade to Starbucks locations across the United States and Canada. This new hot-cup sleeve requires fewer raw materials to make, while increasing the amount of post-consumer content. These adjustments correlate to a savings of nearly 100,000 trees a year, and we are working to roll out EarthSleeve globally.

Our approach is to not only provide customers with cup choices for their beverages, but to also collaborate with others to create locally relevant improvements in the recycling infrastructures of communities where we operate.

Our customers&rsquo ability to recycle our cups (or cups from any coffee shop), whether in their home curbside recycling, at work, in public spaces or in our stores, is dependent on multiple factors, including local government policies and access to recycling markets, such as paper mills and plastic processors. Because recycling infrastructure varies widely around the world, or may not exist at all &ndash even from one city to another &ndash a one-size-fits-all approach does not work for a global business with stores in 64 countries. Some communities readily recycle our paper and plastic cups. However, due to a historical lack of demand for used cup material by the recycling industry, many don&rsquot have the infrastructure in place to handle collection, hauling and processing. Additionally, in our stores operating in leased spaces, our ability to provide recycling for our customers is often dependent upon landlords who control the waste collection and decide whether or not they want to provide recycling. With approximately 20,000 retail locations globally, conditions vary from city to city and from store to store &ndash making it a challenge for us to efficiently and effectively implement uniform recycling strategies.

Starbucks Recycling Infrastructure

We have proven that our used cups can be accepted as a valuable raw material in a variety of recycling systems. We are working as a member of the Foodservice Packaging Institute&rsquos Paper Recovery Alliance and the Plastics Recovery Group to bringing solutions to scale and address common challenges.

By working with non-governmental organizations, policy makers, competitors, our industry associations and others, we can tackle common challenges. We are helping advance a number of meaningful food packaging initiatives that will have a significant impact on the entire industry, such as analysis of the way our packaging &ldquoflows&rdquo through recycling facilities and where it eventually ends up, along with an assessment of the causes of current gaps in recycling services for our products in neighborhoods around the U.S. and Canada .


Cup and Materials

We&rsquove offered a cup with 10% post-consumer recycled paper fiber since 2006, after developing and leading the industry to approve using recycled fiber for food packaging. And we keep working to decrease the materials used in our packaging, finding new ways to encourage reusables and implement recycling solutions for our cups. In 2012 we introduced the EarthSleeve&trade to Starbucks locations across the United States and Canada. This new hot-cup sleeve requires fewer raw materials to make, while increasing the amount of post-consumer content. These adjustments correlate to a savings of nearly 100,000 trees a year, and we are working to roll out EarthSleeve globally.

Our approach is to not only provide customers with cup choices for their beverages, but to also collaborate with others to create locally relevant improvements in the recycling infrastructures of communities where we operate.

Our customers&rsquo ability to recycle our cups (or cups from any coffee shop), whether in their home curbside recycling, at work, in public spaces or in our stores, is dependent on multiple factors, including local government policies and access to recycling markets, such as paper mills and plastic processors. Because recycling infrastructure varies widely around the world, or may not exist at all &ndash even from one city to another &ndash a one-size-fits-all approach does not work for a global business with stores in 64 countries. Some communities readily recycle our paper and plastic cups. However, due to a historical lack of demand for used cup material by the recycling industry, many don&rsquot have the infrastructure in place to handle collection, hauling and processing. Additionally, in our stores operating in leased spaces, our ability to provide recycling for our customers is often dependent upon landlords who control the waste collection and decide whether or not they want to provide recycling. With approximately 20,000 retail locations globally, conditions vary from city to city and from store to store &ndash making it a challenge for us to efficiently and effectively implement uniform recycling strategies.

Starbucks Recycling Infrastructure

We have proven that our used cups can be accepted as a valuable raw material in a variety of recycling systems. We are working as a member of the Foodservice Packaging Institute&rsquos Paper Recovery Alliance and the Plastics Recovery Group to bringing solutions to scale and address common challenges.

By working with non-governmental organizations, policy makers, competitors, our industry associations and others, we can tackle common challenges. We are helping advance a number of meaningful food packaging initiatives that will have a significant impact on the entire industry, such as analysis of the way our packaging &ldquoflows&rdquo through recycling facilities and where it eventually ends up, along with an assessment of the causes of current gaps in recycling services for our products in neighborhoods around the U.S. and Canada .


Cup and Materials

We&rsquove offered a cup with 10% post-consumer recycled paper fiber since 2006, after developing and leading the industry to approve using recycled fiber for food packaging. And we keep working to decrease the materials used in our packaging, finding new ways to encourage reusables and implement recycling solutions for our cups. In 2012 we introduced the EarthSleeve&trade to Starbucks locations across the United States and Canada. This new hot-cup sleeve requires fewer raw materials to make, while increasing the amount of post-consumer content. These adjustments correlate to a savings of nearly 100,000 trees a year, and we are working to roll out EarthSleeve globally.

Our approach is to not only provide customers with cup choices for their beverages, but to also collaborate with others to create locally relevant improvements in the recycling infrastructures of communities where we operate.

Our customers&rsquo ability to recycle our cups (or cups from any coffee shop), whether in their home curbside recycling, at work, in public spaces or in our stores, is dependent on multiple factors, including local government policies and access to recycling markets, such as paper mills and plastic processors. Because recycling infrastructure varies widely around the world, or may not exist at all &ndash even from one city to another &ndash a one-size-fits-all approach does not work for a global business with stores in 64 countries. Some communities readily recycle our paper and plastic cups. However, due to a historical lack of demand for used cup material by the recycling industry, many don&rsquot have the infrastructure in place to handle collection, hauling and processing. Additionally, in our stores operating in leased spaces, our ability to provide recycling for our customers is often dependent upon landlords who control the waste collection and decide whether or not they want to provide recycling. With approximately 20,000 retail locations globally, conditions vary from city to city and from store to store &ndash making it a challenge for us to efficiently and effectively implement uniform recycling strategies.

Starbucks Recycling Infrastructure

We have proven that our used cups can be accepted as a valuable raw material in a variety of recycling systems. We are working as a member of the Foodservice Packaging Institute&rsquos Paper Recovery Alliance and the Plastics Recovery Group to bringing solutions to scale and address common challenges.

By working with non-governmental organizations, policy makers, competitors, our industry associations and others, we can tackle common challenges. We are helping advance a number of meaningful food packaging initiatives that will have a significant impact on the entire industry, such as analysis of the way our packaging &ldquoflows&rdquo through recycling facilities and where it eventually ends up, along with an assessment of the causes of current gaps in recycling services for our products in neighborhoods around the U.S. and Canada .


Cup and Materials

We&rsquove offered a cup with 10% post-consumer recycled paper fiber since 2006, after developing and leading the industry to approve using recycled fiber for food packaging. And we keep working to decrease the materials used in our packaging, finding new ways to encourage reusables and implement recycling solutions for our cups. In 2012 we introduced the EarthSleeve&trade to Starbucks locations across the United States and Canada. This new hot-cup sleeve requires fewer raw materials to make, while increasing the amount of post-consumer content. These adjustments correlate to a savings of nearly 100,000 trees a year, and we are working to roll out EarthSleeve globally.

Our approach is to not only provide customers with cup choices for their beverages, but to also collaborate with others to create locally relevant improvements in the recycling infrastructures of communities where we operate.

Our customers&rsquo ability to recycle our cups (or cups from any coffee shop), whether in their home curbside recycling, at work, in public spaces or in our stores, is dependent on multiple factors, including local government policies and access to recycling markets, such as paper mills and plastic processors. Because recycling infrastructure varies widely around the world, or may not exist at all &ndash even from one city to another &ndash a one-size-fits-all approach does not work for a global business with stores in 64 countries. Some communities readily recycle our paper and plastic cups. However, due to a historical lack of demand for used cup material by the recycling industry, many don&rsquot have the infrastructure in place to handle collection, hauling and processing. Additionally, in our stores operating in leased spaces, our ability to provide recycling for our customers is often dependent upon landlords who control the waste collection and decide whether or not they want to provide recycling. With approximately 20,000 retail locations globally, conditions vary from city to city and from store to store &ndash making it a challenge for us to efficiently and effectively implement uniform recycling strategies.

Starbucks Recycling Infrastructure

We have proven that our used cups can be accepted as a valuable raw material in a variety of recycling systems. We are working as a member of the Foodservice Packaging Institute&rsquos Paper Recovery Alliance and the Plastics Recovery Group to bringing solutions to scale and address common challenges.

By working with non-governmental organizations, policy makers, competitors, our industry associations and others, we can tackle common challenges. We are helping advance a number of meaningful food packaging initiatives that will have a significant impact on the entire industry, such as analysis of the way our packaging &ldquoflows&rdquo through recycling facilities and where it eventually ends up, along with an assessment of the causes of current gaps in recycling services for our products in neighborhoods around the U.S. and Canada .


Cup and Materials

We&rsquove offered a cup with 10% post-consumer recycled paper fiber since 2006, after developing and leading the industry to approve using recycled fiber for food packaging. And we keep working to decrease the materials used in our packaging, finding new ways to encourage reusables and implement recycling solutions for our cups. In 2012 we introduced the EarthSleeve&trade to Starbucks locations across the United States and Canada. This new hot-cup sleeve requires fewer raw materials to make, while increasing the amount of post-consumer content. These adjustments correlate to a savings of nearly 100,000 trees a year, and we are working to roll out EarthSleeve globally.

Our approach is to not only provide customers with cup choices for their beverages, but to also collaborate with others to create locally relevant improvements in the recycling infrastructures of communities where we operate.

Our customers&rsquo ability to recycle our cups (or cups from any coffee shop), whether in their home curbside recycling, at work, in public spaces or in our stores, is dependent on multiple factors, including local government policies and access to recycling markets, such as paper mills and plastic processors. Because recycling infrastructure varies widely around the world, or may not exist at all &ndash even from one city to another &ndash a one-size-fits-all approach does not work for a global business with stores in 64 countries. Some communities readily recycle our paper and plastic cups. However, due to a historical lack of demand for used cup material by the recycling industry, many don&rsquot have the infrastructure in place to handle collection, hauling and processing. Additionally, in our stores operating in leased spaces, our ability to provide recycling for our customers is often dependent upon landlords who control the waste collection and decide whether or not they want to provide recycling. With approximately 20,000 retail locations globally, conditions vary from city to city and from store to store &ndash making it a challenge for us to efficiently and effectively implement uniform recycling strategies.

Starbucks Recycling Infrastructure

We have proven that our used cups can be accepted as a valuable raw material in a variety of recycling systems. We are working as a member of the Foodservice Packaging Institute&rsquos Paper Recovery Alliance and the Plastics Recovery Group to bringing solutions to scale and address common challenges.

By working with non-governmental organizations, policy makers, competitors, our industry associations and others, we can tackle common challenges. We are helping advance a number of meaningful food packaging initiatives that will have a significant impact on the entire industry, such as analysis of the way our packaging &ldquoflows&rdquo through recycling facilities and where it eventually ends up, along with an assessment of the causes of current gaps in recycling services for our products in neighborhoods around the U.S. and Canada .


Cup and Materials

We&rsquove offered a cup with 10% post-consumer recycled paper fiber since 2006, after developing and leading the industry to approve using recycled fiber for food packaging. And we keep working to decrease the materials used in our packaging, finding new ways to encourage reusables and implement recycling solutions for our cups. In 2012 we introduced the EarthSleeve&trade to Starbucks locations across the United States and Canada. This new hot-cup sleeve requires fewer raw materials to make, while increasing the amount of post-consumer content. These adjustments correlate to a savings of nearly 100,000 trees a year, and we are working to roll out EarthSleeve globally.

Our approach is to not only provide customers with cup choices for their beverages, but to also collaborate with others to create locally relevant improvements in the recycling infrastructures of communities where we operate.

Our customers&rsquo ability to recycle our cups (or cups from any coffee shop), whether in their home curbside recycling, at work, in public spaces or in our stores, is dependent on multiple factors, including local government policies and access to recycling markets, such as paper mills and plastic processors. Because recycling infrastructure varies widely around the world, or may not exist at all &ndash even from one city to another &ndash a one-size-fits-all approach does not work for a global business with stores in 64 countries. Some communities readily recycle our paper and plastic cups. However, due to a historical lack of demand for used cup material by the recycling industry, many don&rsquot have the infrastructure in place to handle collection, hauling and processing. Additionally, in our stores operating in leased spaces, our ability to provide recycling for our customers is often dependent upon landlords who control the waste collection and decide whether or not they want to provide recycling. With approximately 20,000 retail locations globally, conditions vary from city to city and from store to store &ndash making it a challenge for us to efficiently and effectively implement uniform recycling strategies.

Starbucks Recycling Infrastructure

We have proven that our used cups can be accepted as a valuable raw material in a variety of recycling systems. We are working as a member of the Foodservice Packaging Institute&rsquos Paper Recovery Alliance and the Plastics Recovery Group to bringing solutions to scale and address common challenges.

By working with non-governmental organizations, policy makers, competitors, our industry associations and others, we can tackle common challenges. We are helping advance a number of meaningful food packaging initiatives that will have a significant impact on the entire industry, such as analysis of the way our packaging &ldquoflows&rdquo through recycling facilities and where it eventually ends up, along with an assessment of the causes of current gaps in recycling services for our products in neighborhoods around the U.S. and Canada .


Cup and Materials

We&rsquove offered a cup with 10% post-consumer recycled paper fiber since 2006, after developing and leading the industry to approve using recycled fiber for food packaging. And we keep working to decrease the materials used in our packaging, finding new ways to encourage reusables and implement recycling solutions for our cups. In 2012 we introduced the EarthSleeve&trade to Starbucks locations across the United States and Canada. This new hot-cup sleeve requires fewer raw materials to make, while increasing the amount of post-consumer content. These adjustments correlate to a savings of nearly 100,000 trees a year, and we are working to roll out EarthSleeve globally.

Our approach is to not only provide customers with cup choices for their beverages, but to also collaborate with others to create locally relevant improvements in the recycling infrastructures of communities where we operate.

Our customers&rsquo ability to recycle our cups (or cups from any coffee shop), whether in their home curbside recycling, at work, in public spaces or in our stores, is dependent on multiple factors, including local government policies and access to recycling markets, such as paper mills and plastic processors. Because recycling infrastructure varies widely around the world, or may not exist at all &ndash even from one city to another &ndash a one-size-fits-all approach does not work for a global business with stores in 64 countries. Some communities readily recycle our paper and plastic cups. However, due to a historical lack of demand for used cup material by the recycling industry, many don&rsquot have the infrastructure in place to handle collection, hauling and processing. Additionally, in our stores operating in leased spaces, our ability to provide recycling for our customers is often dependent upon landlords who control the waste collection and decide whether or not they want to provide recycling. With approximately 20,000 retail locations globally, conditions vary from city to city and from store to store &ndash making it a challenge for us to efficiently and effectively implement uniform recycling strategies.

Starbucks Recycling Infrastructure

We have proven that our used cups can be accepted as a valuable raw material in a variety of recycling systems. We are working as a member of the Foodservice Packaging Institute&rsquos Paper Recovery Alliance and the Plastics Recovery Group to bringing solutions to scale and address common challenges.

By working with non-governmental organizations, policy makers, competitors, our industry associations and others, we can tackle common challenges. We are helping advance a number of meaningful food packaging initiatives that will have a significant impact on the entire industry, such as analysis of the way our packaging &ldquoflows&rdquo through recycling facilities and where it eventually ends up, along with an assessment of the causes of current gaps in recycling services for our products in neighborhoods around the U.S. and Canada .


Cup and Materials

We&rsquove offered a cup with 10% post-consumer recycled paper fiber since 2006, after developing and leading the industry to approve using recycled fiber for food packaging. And we keep working to decrease the materials used in our packaging, finding new ways to encourage reusables and implement recycling solutions for our cups. In 2012 we introduced the EarthSleeve&trade to Starbucks locations across the United States and Canada. This new hot-cup sleeve requires fewer raw materials to make, while increasing the amount of post-consumer content. These adjustments correlate to a savings of nearly 100,000 trees a year, and we are working to roll out EarthSleeve globally.

Our approach is to not only provide customers with cup choices for their beverages, but to also collaborate with others to create locally relevant improvements in the recycling infrastructures of communities where we operate.

Our customers&rsquo ability to recycle our cups (or cups from any coffee shop), whether in their home curbside recycling, at work, in public spaces or in our stores, is dependent on multiple factors, including local government policies and access to recycling markets, such as paper mills and plastic processors. Because recycling infrastructure varies widely around the world, or may not exist at all &ndash even from one city to another &ndash a one-size-fits-all approach does not work for a global business with stores in 64 countries. Some communities readily recycle our paper and plastic cups. However, due to a historical lack of demand for used cup material by the recycling industry, many don&rsquot have the infrastructure in place to handle collection, hauling and processing. Additionally, in our stores operating in leased spaces, our ability to provide recycling for our customers is often dependent upon landlords who control the waste collection and decide whether or not they want to provide recycling. With approximately 20,000 retail locations globally, conditions vary from city to city and from store to store &ndash making it a challenge for us to efficiently and effectively implement uniform recycling strategies.

Starbucks Recycling Infrastructure

We have proven that our used cups can be accepted as a valuable raw material in a variety of recycling systems. We are working as a member of the Foodservice Packaging Institute&rsquos Paper Recovery Alliance and the Plastics Recovery Group to bringing solutions to scale and address common challenges.

By working with non-governmental organizations, policy makers, competitors, our industry associations and others, we can tackle common challenges. We are helping advance a number of meaningful food packaging initiatives that will have a significant impact on the entire industry, such as analysis of the way our packaging &ldquoflows&rdquo through recycling facilities and where it eventually ends up, along with an assessment of the causes of current gaps in recycling services for our products in neighborhoods around the U.S. and Canada .


Cup and Materials

We&rsquove offered a cup with 10% post-consumer recycled paper fiber since 2006, after developing and leading the industry to approve using recycled fiber for food packaging. And we keep working to decrease the materials used in our packaging, finding new ways to encourage reusables and implement recycling solutions for our cups. In 2012 we introduced the EarthSleeve&trade to Starbucks locations across the United States and Canada. This new hot-cup sleeve requires fewer raw materials to make, while increasing the amount of post-consumer content. These adjustments correlate to a savings of nearly 100,000 trees a year, and we are working to roll out EarthSleeve globally.

Our approach is to not only provide customers with cup choices for their beverages, but to also collaborate with others to create locally relevant improvements in the recycling infrastructures of communities where we operate.

Our customers&rsquo ability to recycle our cups (or cups from any coffee shop), whether in their home curbside recycling, at work, in public spaces or in our stores, is dependent on multiple factors, including local government policies and access to recycling markets, such as paper mills and plastic processors. Because recycling infrastructure varies widely around the world, or may not exist at all &ndash even from one city to another &ndash a one-size-fits-all approach does not work for a global business with stores in 64 countries. Some communities readily recycle our paper and plastic cups. However, due to a historical lack of demand for used cup material by the recycling industry, many don&rsquot have the infrastructure in place to handle collection, hauling and processing. Additionally, in our stores operating in leased spaces, our ability to provide recycling for our customers is often dependent upon landlords who control the waste collection and decide whether or not they want to provide recycling. With approximately 20,000 retail locations globally, conditions vary from city to city and from store to store &ndash making it a challenge for us to efficiently and effectively implement uniform recycling strategies.

Starbucks Recycling Infrastructure

We have proven that our used cups can be accepted as a valuable raw material in a variety of recycling systems. We are working as a member of the Foodservice Packaging Institute&rsquos Paper Recovery Alliance and the Plastics Recovery Group to bringing solutions to scale and address common challenges.

By working with non-governmental organizations, policy makers, competitors, our industry associations and others, we can tackle common challenges. We are helping advance a number of meaningful food packaging initiatives that will have a significant impact on the entire industry, such as analysis of the way our packaging &ldquoflows&rdquo through recycling facilities and where it eventually ends up, along with an assessment of the causes of current gaps in recycling services for our products in neighborhoods around the U.S. and Canada .


Cup and Materials

We&rsquove offered a cup with 10% post-consumer recycled paper fiber since 2006, after developing and leading the industry to approve using recycled fiber for food packaging. And we keep working to decrease the materials used in our packaging, finding new ways to encourage reusables and implement recycling solutions for our cups. In 2012 we introduced the EarthSleeve&trade to Starbucks locations across the United States and Canada. This new hot-cup sleeve requires fewer raw materials to make, while increasing the amount of post-consumer content. These adjustments correlate to a savings of nearly 100,000 trees a year, and we are working to roll out EarthSleeve globally.

Our approach is to not only provide customers with cup choices for their beverages, but to also collaborate with others to create locally relevant improvements in the recycling infrastructures of communities where we operate.

Our customers&rsquo ability to recycle our cups (or cups from any coffee shop), whether in their home curbside recycling, at work, in public spaces or in our stores, is dependent on multiple factors, including local government policies and access to recycling markets, such as paper mills and plastic processors. Because recycling infrastructure varies widely around the world, or may not exist at all &ndash even from one city to another &ndash a one-size-fits-all approach does not work for a global business with stores in 64 countries. Some communities readily recycle our paper and plastic cups. However, due to a historical lack of demand for used cup material by the recycling industry, many don&rsquot have the infrastructure in place to handle collection, hauling and processing. Additionally, in our stores operating in leased spaces, our ability to provide recycling for our customers is often dependent upon landlords who control the waste collection and decide whether or not they want to provide recycling. With approximately 20,000 retail locations globally, conditions vary from city to city and from store to store &ndash making it a challenge for us to efficiently and effectively implement uniform recycling strategies.

Starbucks Recycling Infrastructure

We have proven that our used cups can be accepted as a valuable raw material in a variety of recycling systems. We are working as a member of the Foodservice Packaging Institute&rsquos Paper Recovery Alliance and the Plastics Recovery Group to bringing solutions to scale and address common challenges.

By working with non-governmental organizations, policy makers, competitors, our industry associations and others, we can tackle common challenges. We are helping advance a number of meaningful food packaging initiatives that will have a significant impact on the entire industry, such as analysis of the way our packaging &ldquoflows&rdquo through recycling facilities and where it eventually ends up, along with an assessment of the causes of current gaps in recycling services for our products in neighborhoods around the U.S. and Canada .