Other

BombeBasticks Recipe

BombeBasticks Recipe


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Ingredients

Dark Chocolate or White Chocolate Bombe Shells

  • 12 ounces semisweet or bittersweet chocolate (60%–72%) or high-quality white chocolate, chopped
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon (optional for dark chocolate shell)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest (optional for white chocolate shell)

Assembly

  • 8 standard sugar ice cream cones
  • 1/2 cup garnish, such as Rice Krispies, chopped pistachios, or crushed pretzels, cornflakes, Fritos, or lemon candies

Recipe Preparation

Bombe Shell

  • Combine dark or white chocolate and coconut oil in a medium metal bowl; set over a medium saucepan of simmering water. Stir until chocolate is almost melted. Remove from heat and continue stirring until completely melted and smooth. Stir in cinnamon or lemon zest, if using. Let cool slightly (if it's too hot, it'll melt your ice cream), 10–15 minutes.

Assembly

  • Fill 8 medium glasses halfway with sugar to hold cones upright; set aside.

  • Working with 1 cone at a time, spoon about 1/4 cup bombe shell inside cone and swirl to coat. Pour excess back into bowl, then dip top 1/2 inch of cone into bombe shell, allowing excess to drip back into bowl. Set cone upright in a prepared glass; chill in refrigerator until chocolate hardens, about 15 minutes. Repeat with remaining cones.

  • Line a large rimmed baking sheet with foil. Pack some ice cream into cones, then top each with a small scoop of ice cream. Lay cones on prepared sheet and freeze until hard, about 1 hour.

  • Rewarm bombe shell. Working with 1 cone at a time, dip ice cream into bombe shell, rolling to coat. Quickly sprinkle on desired garnish. Freeze until hard, about 10 minutes. DO AHEAD: Can be made 1 week ahead. Wrap each cone in foil; keep frozen.

Recipe by Jeni s Splendid in Columbus Ohio,

Nutritional Content

One serving contains: Calories (kcal) 650 Fat (g) 44 Saturated Fat (g) 27 Cholesterol (mg) 120 Carbohydrates (g) 60 Dietary Fiber (g) 3 Total Sugars (g) 49 Protein (g) 10 Sodium (mg) 130Reviews Section

Baked Conchiglie with Spicy Sausage, Kale, and Ricotta

The Setting: A mostly cloudy day in Nashville.

The Soundtrack: Oia's delightful baby banter.

Steaming up the Oven: Chocolate cake for a new recipe to be disclosed soon. assuming it turns out alright.

The Scenario: Comfort in a bowl, coming your way.

Every now and then I get a ridiculously intense, won't-go-away, got-to-have-it craving for lasagna.

It's not the layers of pasta that elicit this sensation--though, hey, layers of pasta are great.

But what makes me purr like Garfield the cat is that perfect combination of ultra-comforting flavors and textures: spicy, meaty, Italian sausage juicy, acidic, and slightly sweet tomato stretchy-gooey, melted mozzarella, golden and crunchy around the edges of the dish and, most of all, super-fresh, creamy ricotta, oozing out with every press of fork to pasta.

In truth, it was the desire for fresh, local ricotta above all that sent me to the store not so long ago with a list of lasagna ingredients in hand.

So when a charming brown-paper bag of imported conchiglie (con-KEEL-yay) caught my eye on the pasta aisle, I placed my wavy lasagna sheets right back on the shelf and eagerly plopped the bag of curvy, ridged, ricotta-catching shells into my basket.

With pasta that traps the creamy cheese and hearty sauce so well, each bite is like a little present, popping with flavor and literally oozing with yumminess in every bite.

Look for fresh, locally made ricotta if you can--it makes all the difference!

Baked Conchiglie with Spicy Sausage, Kale, and Ricotta
Conchiglie simply means shells. While the word most often refers to the familiar conch-style shells of mac-and-cheese fame, it may also refer to the snail-shell-style conchiglie that inspired this dish. These particular shells are also often called lumache, which, appropriately enough, means snails.

1 lb hot Italian turkey sausage
4 medium-sized shallots, finely chopped (1 large or two small white onions would be fine in this dish as well I just happened to have shallots on hand)
2 medium-sized carrots, finely chopped
2 ribs celery, finely chopped
freshly cracked black pepper
crushed red pepper flakes
salt
2 tsp garlic powder
1 T dried oregano
2 tsp dried basil
8 oz frozen chopped kale
2 (15 oz) cans plain tomato sauce
1 lb dried conchiglie
olive oil for the baking dish
2 lbs fresh ricotta
1 lb shredded mozzarella
several leaves fresh basil and flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped

Remove the casings from the sausage and brown the meat in a saute pan or skillet over med-high heat, using a heatproof rubber spatula to crumble the sausage into little pieces.

Meanwhile, place the shallots, carrots, and celery in a medium-sized saucepan over medium heat and season with black pepper and crushed red pepper flakes. Cover and cook 6 minutes. Season lightly with salt, add garlic powder and dried herbs, cover, and cook 10 minutes or until shallots and celery are translucent and carrots are softened, stirring occasionally and adjusting the heat if necessary.

When the sausage crumbles have browned on all sides, add the frozen kale to the sausage pan and season lightly with salt and pepper, stirring to combine. Reduce heat to med-low, cover, and cook just until kale has thawed. The moisture from the kale will help loosen any fond (browned bits) from the bottom of the pan so that you can scrape them up and incorporate them into the mixture.

Transfer the sausage mixture to the saucepan with the veggies. Stir in both cans of tomato sauce, cover, and cook while you prepare the pasta.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Lightly grease two 8x8x3-inch casserole dishes with olive oil.

Bring 4 quarts of generously salted water to boil in a large pot--you'll want to use about 1 T fine-grain salt or 1 1/2 T coarse salt.

Add the pasta and boil 8 minutes or until al dente (soft to touch but with a little firmness left in the bite). Strain the pasta, add it back to the pot, and return the pot to a burner set to low heat for about 1 minute to help drive off any excess moisture.

Pour the sauce over the pasta, and stir to coat evenly.

Place 1/4 of the pasta in each of the two prepared dishes, spreading the pasta into an even layer in each.

Dollop the ricotta (1 lb for each dish) evenly over the top of the pasta.

Spread out the riccotta in an even layer if desired, top with the remaining pasta, and finish with the shredded mozzarella.

Bake at 400 degrees F for 15 minutes, or until the mozzarella is completely melted and verging on golden and bubbly. Sprinkle with the fresh herbs, and serve.


Sunday, September 30, 2012

Coconut Avocado Smoothie


This last year I have been diagnosed with Hashimoto's a thyroid autoimmune disease, that leaves me exhausted all the time. Although, I had been on a Paleo diet, I was not diligent with staying away from gluten, and was doing a lot of my baking with almond flour and other kinds of nut flours. Slowly, while doing paleo type diet 95% of the time, I gained weight. I also began to lose all of my energy, to where it was hard for me to even get out of bed. Literally, I felt like I was slowly dying.

After a trip to the doctor, the blood labs came back with an elevated TPO antibodies. It has always been my goal not to take any medications, even advil. My doctor agreed with me, in not taking the medication for the time being, and I am giving my body a couple of months before I go into an endocrinologist to get more test done.

In my decision to not take medication, I have felt tired and wiped out. Around 3:00 p.m., is when I feel most tapped out and ready to go take a nap. Feeling groggy, with no energy, unable to even form a thought. I have been fighting through it, the best I know how.

There has been a lot of changes that I have made to my diet. Adapting to my body. Now, gluten is not even an option. It activates my antibodies to attack my thyroid for weeks to months, putting me at a higher risk of thyroid cancer. Soy, is another poison that I dare not touch. Strawberries have been eliminated and the list can go on.

Where I used to eat bacon, eggs, and coffee for breakfast, and still find myself hungry an hour later, I now have been drinking a smoothie, that fills me up for hours and gives me a boost of energy that last several hours too. This energy is incredible, and I feel amazing instantaneously. My husband (who used to hate everything that would make up this drink) has been drinking it as well, and is trading in his morning breakfast for this smoothie too.

Although, my new diet habits are evolving, I no longer consider myself paleo, but still do eat very close to that. Diets have never worked for me, but eating as healthy as I can, without depriving myself, has always been key. Our goal is to have another baby, and I know that my health is upmost important. Crash dieting will not solve my health problems, but listening to my body, to how food makes me feel, how exercising make me feel, will. I may not be at the weight have been at in my past, but I am happy now, and will honor and cherish this body. When I drink this shake, I feel like I am doing exactly that. Cherishing my body.


Friday, July 13, 2012

Braised Short Ribs and Polyface Farms

The Setting: A toy-scattered apartment in need of a good vacuuming.

The Soundtrack: Relative silence.

On the Stovetop: Chicken breasts for Vietnamese Chicken Salad.

The Scenario: Last weekend, Oia, Hoosband and I ventured down to Polyface Farms, home of outspoken champion of sustainable agriculture and author of such books as Salad Bar Beef, Folks, This Ain't Normal, and Everything I Want to Do is Illegal, Joel Salatin.

Farmers at heart ourselves and longtime fans of Salatin, we were excited to check out the farm, get a little inspiration, let the little one see some real, live farm animals, and pick up some organic, grass-fed meat.

Majestically situated in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley, the "farm of many faces" produces forage-based rabbits, "Pigaerator Pork," stewing hens, pastured turkeys, pastured broilers, pastured eggs, sustainable lumber, and "Salad Bar Beef."

Polyface cows (you can see one in the distance--it's the speck to the left of the third tree) feast on a new salad bar of pasture almost every day, which leads to healthier cows, healthier meat, and a healthier Earth.

Pigs work as they lounge, aerating their thick bedding and helping turn it into fertile compost.

Pastured broilers are moved to fresh pasture daily. They get plenty of exercise and eat local, GMO-free grains and freshly sprouted grasses.



Cake, sugar or waffle cone?

Tahitian Vanilla ice cream from "Humphry Slocombe Ice Cream Book" by Jake Godby, Sean Vahey and Paulo Lucchesi (Chronicle Books).

4 of 8 Blackberry ice cream from "Sweet Cream and Sugar cones" by Kris Hoogerhyde, Anne Walker and Dabney Gough (Ten Speed Press). Paige Green Show More Show Less

5 of 8 Cover: "Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home" by Jeni Britton Bauer (Artisan Books). Stacy Newgent Show More Show Less

6 of 8 Brown sugar ice cream with a ginger-caramel swirl from "Sweet Cream and Sugar cones" by Kris Hoogerhyde, Anne Walker and Dabney Gough (Ten Speed Press). Paige Green Show More Show Less

7 of 8 Cover: "Humphry Slocombe Ice Cream Book" by Jake Godby, Sean Vahey and Paulo Lucchesi (Chronicle Books). Frankie Frankeny Show More Show Less

8 of 8 Cover: "Sweet Cream and Sugar cones" by Kris Hoogerhyde, Anne Walker and Dabney Gough (Ten Speed Press). Paige Green Show More Show Less

The typical question when it comes to ice cream is "Chocolate, strawberry or vanilla?" I would suggest that as important an ice cream concern is "Cake, waffle or sugar?" After all, isn't the mode of transportation just as important as the flavor of your super scoops?

Summer means big, dripping orbs of ice cream (or gelato or frozen custard) which also means important decisions about your frozen treat's vessel. Three types of cones are the most common: cake (those airy, vaguely Stryofoam-ish flat-bottomed cones you see at Dairy Queen), waffle (rustic, lacey-edged cornets formed from pizzelles or thin waffle cookies) and sugar (same as waffle cone but with a straight, finished top - and can be lined with chocolate a la Drumstick).

Growing up in the '60s, there really wasn't much choice in the supermarkets when it came to cones. Cake cones prevailed, and we were happy to carry the torch we knew so well from our trips to DQ. The only time we ever saw a sugar cone were the rare occasions we were treated to an ice cream novelty such as a Drumstick or Nutty Buddy. Waffle cones were for the truly fortunate - maybe a once-a-year state fair type of indulgence.

Today, even the most modest ice cream shop provides a choice in cones, a populist turn of events that puts every kind of cone in everyone's hands. Supermarkets, too, sell sugar and waffle cones.

And if you're so inclined, you can also make them at home - a route some foodies might prefer, especially if they're also making their own ice cream. Making cookie cones at home isn't difficult suggests two ice cream cookbooks - the new "Sweet Cream and Sugar Cones" (Ten Speed Press, $24.99) and "Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams At Home" (Artisan Books, $23.95) which recently won a James Beard Foundation media award.

"Sweet Cream and Sugar Cones" offers a recipe for baking sugar cones which requires a nonstick baking mat and a cone mold which you can buy at a cooking supplies store or make at home. That recipe also allows you to make ice cream bowls, which is the same sugar cone shaped into a bowl. The cone recipe in "Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home" requires a waffle cone iron and a cone mold.

Here are your recipes for a delicious summer (including one for homemade vanilla ice cream and one for a chocolate shell so you can make your own dip cones):

Sugar Cones and Bowl

From "Sweet Cream and Sugar Cones" by Kris Hoogerhyde, Anne Walker and Dabney Gough

Makes about 15 cones or bowls

Equipment needed: Nonstick baking mat, a small offset spatula and the mold of your choice (a metal or wooden cone shaper, a homemade shaper or a teacup)

1¼ cups powdered sugar, measured then sifted

½ cup egg whites (from about 4 large eggs)

¾ cup plus 2 tablespoons unbleached all-purpose flour

½ cup unsalted butter, melted

Instructions: Position a rack in the center of the oven and preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line a baking sheet with a nonstick mat.

Combine the powdered sugar and egg whites in a medium mixing bowl and whisk together.

Add the flour, mix to blend, and add the melted butter.

Mix again until blended and smooth.

Put a scant 2 tablespoons of batter in one corner of the nonstick mat and use a small offset spatula to spread the batter to a thin circle 5 inches in diameter. Try to spread the batter thinly and evenly for maximum crispiness.

Repeat up to three more times, as the baking sheet allows. You can place them fairly close together, since they don't spread when baking, but you shouldn't bake more than four at a time, because the baked circles will harden before you're able to shape them all.

Bake for 6 to 7 minutes, rotating the pan during the last few minutes to help the cones brown evenly, until the edges of the batter are golden brown. Meanwhile, wash and dry the spatula.

To make cones: As soon as the baking sheet comes out of the oven, use the offset spatula to lift one of the circles and place it upside down on a work surface. To shape the cones, follow the step-by-step instructions provided in the graphic on Page F1.

To make bowls: Set a teacup upside down on the counter. As soon as the cookie sheet comes out of the oven, place a warm cookie over the cup. Use your hands to gently press the cookie down toward the sides of the teacup. Let cool for a second and repeat with the remaining circles. Shelf life for both cones and bowls: 1 day.

Ice Cream Cones

From "Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home" by Jeni Britton Bauer

Makes 8 medium cones (4 to 6 inches tall and 2 inches across the top)

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 teaspoon almond extract

5 tablespoons unsalted butter melted and cooled slightly

Instructions: Turn on waffle cone iron.

Combine the egg whites and cream in a medium bowl and whisk to combine.

Add sugar, salt and both extracts and whisk for about a minute to combine well. Whisk in the melted butter. Add the flour, whisking only until the lumps have disappeared and the batter is smooth.

Make the cones in the waffle cone iron according to the directions for your iron. To shape the cones, follow the step-by-step instructions provided in the graphic on Page F1. The cones are best the same day they are made, but will keep for a week in a sealed container.

Tahitian Vanilla Ice Cream

From "Humphry Slocombe Ice Cream Book" (Chronicle Books, $19.95) by Jake Godby, Sean Vahey and Paolo Lucchesi

3 tablespoons malt powder

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Instructions: Fill a large bowl or pan with ice and water. Place a large clean bowl in the ice bath and fit the bowl with a fine mesh strainer. In a large, heavy-bottomed, nonreactive saucepan over medium heat, combine the cream, milk and salt and cook, stirring occasionally, until hot but not boiling.

Meanwhile, split the vanilla bean lengthwise. Using the tip of a small, sharp knife, scrape out the insides into a medium bowl. Add the sugar and malt powder and rub it all together with your fingers to incorporate and evenly distribute the vanilla seeds. Get all the last bits from the bean (save the pod). Whisk in the egg yolks and vanilla extract.

Remove the cream mixture from the heat. Slowly pour about half the hot cream mixture into the yolk mixture, whisking constantly. Transfer the yolk mixture back to the saucepan with the remaining cream mixture and return it to medium heat. Cook, stirring constantly with a rubber spatula and being sure to scrape the bottom of the saucepan so it doesn't scorch, until the liquid begins to steam and you can feel the spatula scrape against the bottom of the pan, 2 to 3 minutes.

Remove the custard from the heat and immediately pour it through the strainer into the clean bowl you set up in the ice bath. Tuck the vanilla bean pod back into the custard. Let cool completely, stirring occasionally. When the custard has totally cooled, cover the bowl and let steep and chill in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour or preferably overnight.

When you are ready to freeze the custard, remove the bean, transfer the custard to an ice cream maker, and spin according to the manufacturer's instructions.

Eat immediately or transfer to an airtight container, cover, and freeze up to 1 week.

Chocolate Bombe Shell

From "Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home"

12 ounces bittersweet chocolate (60 percent or greater cocoa), chopped

Combine the chocolate and coconut oil in a double boiler and heat, stirring frequently, until the chocolate is almost melted.

Remove from the heat and stir until completely melted and smooth. Let cool, then store, covered or in a jar, in the refrigerator. The chocolate will keep for up to 3 weeks. To use the chocolate, you can melt it by leaving it in a warm place - like a windowsill or the porch - for half an hour, then stir until smooth.

Or scrape it into a bowl, set in a larger bowl of very warm tap water, and let stand, stirring occasionally, until liquefied and smooth.

You can also melt it in the microwave, heating it for 20-second intervals and stirring often, but be careful not to let it overheat.


Cake, waffle or sugar?

Tahitian Vanilla ice cream from "Humphry Slocombe Ice Cream Book" by Jake Godby, Sean Vahey and Paulo Lucchesi (Chronicle Books).

4 of 20 Blackberry ice cream from "Sweet Cream and Sugar cones" by Kris Hoogerhyde, Anne Walker and Dabney Gough (Ten Speed Press). Paige Green Show More Show Less

5 of 20 1. Pour batter onto the waffle iron, cook and then pull the baked round off the iron. Steps 1-6 of How to Make Ice Cream Cones from "Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home" by Jeni Britton Bauer (Artisan Books). Stacy Newgent Show More Show Less

7 of 20 Step2. Position the roller across the middle, leaving room at the bottom to grip the point of the cone. s 1-6 of How to Make Ice Cream Cones from "Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home" by Jeni Britton Bauer (Artisan Books). Stacy Newgent Show More Show Less

8 of 20 3. Working quickly, fold one side across the roller and. Steps 1-6 of How to Make Ice Cream Cones from "Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home" by Jeni Britton Bauer (Artisan Books). Stacy Newgent Show More Show Less

10 of 20 4. Tuck the cone slightly under the roller near its tip. Steps 1-6 of How to Make Ice Cream Cones from "Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home" by Jeni Britton Bauer (Artisan Books). Stacy Newgent Show More Show Less

11 of 20 5. Pressing firmly, roll the cone over to finish. Steps 1-6 of How to Make Ice Cream Cones from "Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home" by Jeni Britton Bauer (Artisan Books). Stacy Newgent Show More Show Less

13 of 20 6. Allow the cone to cool for a few moments. Remove and repeat. Steps 1-6 of How to Make Ice Cream Cones from "Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home" by Jeni Britton Bauer (Artisan Books). Stacy Newgent Show More Show Less

14 of 20 Cover: "Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home" by Jeni Britton Bauer (Artisan Books). Stacy Newgent Show More Show Less

16 of 20 Brown sugar ice cream with a ginger-caramel swirl from "Sweet Cream and Sugar cones" by Kris Hoogerhyde, Anne Walker and Dabney Gough (Ten Speed Press). Paige Green Show More Show Less

17 of 20 Cover: "Humphry Slocombe Ice Cream Book" by Jake Godby, Sean Vahey and Paulo Lucchesi (Chronicle Books). Frankie Frankeny Show More Show Less

19 of 20 Cover: "Sweet Cream and Sugar cones" by Kris Hoogerhyde, Anne Walker and Dabney Gough (Ten Speed Press). Paige Green Show More Show Less

The typical question when it comes to ice cream is "Chocolate, strawberry or vanilla?" I would suggest that as important an ice cream concern is "Cake, waffle or sugar?" After all, isn't the mode of transportation just as important as the flavor of your super scoops?

Summer means big, dripping orbs of ice cream (or gelato or frozen custard) which also means important decisions about your frozen treat's vessel. Three types of cones are the most common: cake (those airy, vaguely Stryofoam-ish flat-bottomed cones you see at Dairy Queen), waffle (rustic, lacey-edged cornets formed from pizzelles or thin waffle cookies) and sugar (same as waffle cone but with a straight, finished top - and can be lined with chocolate a la Drumstick).

Growing up in the '60s, there really wasn't much choice in the supermarkets when it came to cones. Cake cones prevailed, and we were happy to carry the torch we knew so well from our trips to DQ. The only time we ever saw a sugar cone were the rare occasions we were treated to an ice cream novelty such as a Drumstick or Nutty Buddy. Waffle cones were for the truly fortunate - maybe a once-a-year state fair type of indulgence.

Today, even the most modest ice cream shop provides a choice in cones, a populist turn of events that puts every kind of cone in everyone's hands. Supermarkets, too, sell sugar and waffle cones.

And if you're so inclined, you can also make them at home - a route some foodies might prefer, especially if they're also making their own ice cream. Making cookie cones at home isn't difficult suggests two ice cream cookbooks - the new "Sweet Cream and Sugar Cones" (Ten Speed Press, $24.99) and "Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams At Home" (Artisan Books, $23.95) which recently won a James Beard Foundation media award.

"Sweet Cream and Sugar Cones" offers a recipe for baking sugar cones which requires a nonstick baking mat and a cone mold which you can buy at a cooking supplies store or make at home. That recipe also allows you to make ice cream bowls, which is the same sugar cone shaped into a bowl. The cone recipe in "Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home" requires a waffle cone iron and a cone mold.

Here are your recipes for a delicious summer (including one for homemade vanilla ice cream and one for a chocolate shell so you can make your own dip cones):

Here are step-by-step instructions for making your own ice cream cones as directed by Jeni Britton Bauer in "Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home."

1. Pour batter onto the waffle iron, cook and then pull the baked round off the iron.

2. Position the roller across the middle, leaving room at the bottom to grip the point of the cone.

3. Working quickly, fold one side across the roller and.

4. Tuck the cone slightly under the roller near its tip.

5. Pressing firmly, roll the cone over to finish.

6. Allow the cone to cool for a few moments. Remove and repeat.

Making an ice cream cone mold:

1. Trace this yellow pattern and transfer it to a piece of thin cardboard (the thickness of a cereal box is ideal).

2. Roll the cardboard into a cone and use packing tape to secure the seam.

3. Fill the cone with dried beans or uncooked rice and seal the top with tape. Then wrap in aluminum foil.

4. You're now ready to make cones.

Sugar Cones and Bowl

From "Sweet Cream and Sugar Cones" by Kris Hoogerhyde, Anne Walker and Dabney Gough

Makes about 15 cones or bowls

Equipment needed: Nonstick baking mat, a small offset spatula and the mold of your choice (a metal or wooden cone shaper, a homemade shaper or a teacup)

1¼ cups powdered sugar, measured then sifted

½ cup egg whites (from about 4 large eggs)

¾ cup plus 2 tablespoons unbleached all-purpose flour

½ cup unsalted butter, melted

Instructions: Position a rack in the center of the oven and preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line a baking sheet with a nonstick mat.

Combine the powdered sugar and egg whites in a medium mixing bowl and whisk together.

Add the flour, mix to blend, and add the melted butter.

Mix again until blended and smooth.

Put a scant 2 tablespoons of batter in one corner of the nonstick mat and use a small offset spatula to spread the batter to a thin circle 5 inches in diameter. Try to spread the batter thinly and evenly for maximum crispiness.

Repeat up to three more times, as the baking sheet allows. You can place them fairly close together, since they don't spread when baking, but you shouldn't bake more than four at a time, because the baked circles will harden before you're able to shape them all.

Bake for 6 to 7 minutes, rotating the pan during the last few minutes to help the cones brown evenly, until the edges of the batter are golden brown. Meanwhile, wash and dry the spatula.

To make cones: As soon as the baking sheet comes out of the oven, use the offset spatula to lift one of the circles and place it upside down on a work surface. To shape the cones, follow the step-by-step instructions provided in the graphic on Page F1.

To make bowls: Set a teacup upside down on the counter. As soon as the cookie sheet comes out of the oven, place a warm cookie over the cup. Use your hands to gently press the cookie down toward the sides of the teacup. Let cool for a second and repeat with the remaining circles. Shelf life for both cones and bowls: 1 day.

Ice Cream Cones

From "Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home" by Jeni Britton Bauer

Makes 8 medium cones (4 to 6 inches tall and 2 inches across the top)

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 teaspoon almond extract

5 tablespoons unsalted butter melted and cooled slightly

Instructions: Turn on waffle cone iron.

Combine the egg whites and cream in a medium bowl and whisk to combine.

Add sugar, salt and both extracts and whisk for about a minute to combine well. Whisk in the melted butter. Add the flour, whisking only until the lumps have disappeared and the batter is smooth.

Make the cones in the waffle cone iron according to the directions for your iron. To shape the cones, follow the step-by-step instructions provided in the graphic on Page F1. The cones are best the same day they are made, but will keep for a week in a sealed container.

Tahitian Vanilla Ice Cream

From "Humphry Slocombe Ice Cream Book" (Chronicle Books, $19.95) by Jake Godby, Sean Vahey and Paolo Lucchesi

3 tablespoons malt powder

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Instructions: Fill a large bowl or pan with ice and water. Place a large clean bowl in the ice bath and fit the bowl with a fine mesh strainer. In a large, heavy-bottomed, nonreactive saucepan over medium heat, combine the cream, milk and salt and cook, stirring occasionally, until hot but not boiling.

Meanwhile, split the vanilla bean lengthwise. Using the tip of a small, sharp knife, scrape out the insides into a medium bowl. Add the sugar and malt powder and rub it all together with your fingers to incorporate and evenly distribute the vanilla seeds. Get all the last bits from the bean (save the pod). Whisk in the egg yolks and vanilla extract.

Remove the cream mixture from the heat. Slowly pour about half the hot cream mixture into the yolk mixture, whisking constantly. Transfer the yolk mixture back to the saucepan with the remaining cream mixture and return it to medium heat. Cook, stirring constantly with a rubber spatula and being sure to scrape the bottom of the saucepan so it doesn't scorch, until the liquid begins to steam and you can feel the spatula scrape against the bottom of the pan, 2 to 3 minutes.

Remove the custard from the heat and immediately pour it through the strainer into the clean bowl you set up in the ice bath. Tuck the vanilla bean pod back into the custard. Let cool completely, stirring occasionally. When the custard has totally cooled, cover the bowl and let steep and chill in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour or preferably overnight.

When you are ready to freeze the custard, remove the bean, transfer the custard to an ice cream maker, and spin according to the manufacturer's instructions.

Eat immediately or transfer to an airtight container, cover, and freeze up to 1 week.

Chocolate Bombe Shell

From "Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home"

12 ounces bittersweet chocolate (60 percent or greater cocoa), chopped

Combine the chocolate and coconut oil in a double boiler and heat, stirring frequently, until the chocolate is almost melted.

Remove from the heat and stir until completely melted and smooth. Let cool, then store, covered or in a jar, in the refrigerator. The chocolate will keep for up to 3 weeks. To use the chocolate, you can melt it by leaving it in a warm place - like a windowsill or the porch - for half an hour, then stir until smooth.

Or scrape it into a bowl, set in a larger bowl of very warm tap water, and let stand, stirring occasionally, until liquefied and smooth.

You can also melt it in the microwave, heating it for 20-second intervals and stirring often, but be careful not to let it overheat.


Farmers' market sundae

From Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home: More Than 100 Addictively Good Artisanal Recipes Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home by Jeni Britton Bauer

Are you sure you want to delete this recipe from your Bookshelf. Doing so will remove all the Bookmarks you have created for this recipe.

  • Categories: Ice cream & frozen desserts Dessert Summer
  • Ingredients: blueberries honey tawny Port wine lemons yogurt milk cream cheese heavy cream sugar light corn syrup mint

The Epicurious Blog

With fireworks, parades, backyard barbecues, and food fresh from the grill, there&aposs a lot to love about the Fourth of July. For this year&aposs July 4th celebration, we&aposre going big and bold with red, white, and blue party decorations, recipes, and drinks. And the best part is that they&aposre all easy enough to pull together at the last minute.

Put a patriotic spin on your backyard bash with our easy DIY table crafts. Dyed rice candleholders are flag-inspired, and make a perfect activity for younger guests. Once you&aposve dyed the rice with food coloring, set the kids up to create their own red, white, and blue rice mosaics. Painting and gluing together our festive star garland is another fun project for the kids, and can be used to decorate tables, a fence, or even a few trees. Our table crafts also include bandana napkins and napkin rings and super simple flower arrangements.

We have tons of red, white, and blue recipes, including ice cream cake, berries with yogurt, and a star-emblazoned tart, but our favorite is the red velvet cake created by Gourmet Live&aposs Kemp Minifie. With luscious, tangy cream cheese frosting and a pile of fresh berries, we think this is the very best red velvet cake around.

The red, white, and blue theme continues at the bar with our red, white, and blue sangria recipes. Make these patriotic pitcher drinks in big batches a couple hours before your celebration so you can kick back and enjoy the fireworks.

For more recipes and party ideas, see our complete guide to celebrating the Fourth of July.

&aposA Feast of Ice and Fire&apos

Fans of George R. R. Martin&aposs book series A Song of Ice and Fire (which spawned HBO&aposs series Game of Thrones) are likely familiar with Chelsea Monroe-Cassel and Sariann Lehrer&aposs blog, Inn at the Crossroads. Over the last year and a half, the women have cataloged the foods Martin writes about in the series. They&aposve tracked down ancient and medieval recipes, made them (sometimes updating them), and staged elaborate photo shoots to show how the dishes might have appeared on the tables of fictional Westeros.

The blog caught the attention of Martin, who sanctioned an official companion cookbook written by the Boston-based duo, A Feast of Ice and Fire, which hit bookstores Tuesday. Martin even wrote the introduction, noting the ladies appearance during his most recent book tour, where they presented him with a basket of lemon cakes, meat pies, and "other goodies to keep me from feeling peckish during the signing."

"Thereafter, as I made my way from coast to coast, in a dozen different cities, confederates of theirs and readers of their blog turned up at most every signing, with more baskets and more dishes, each more toothsome than the last," he wrote.

Monroe-Cassel spoke with us about the blog&aposs origins, some of the harder dishes to recreate, and what it&aposs like to have Martin&aposs stamp of approval.

Epicurious: How did this project begin?

Chelsea Monroe-Cassel: In March 2011, the two of us were sitting in the kitchen trying to figure out what we were going to make for dinner, and we eventually gave up on that and started talking about Game of Thrones instead, and somehow came around to deciding that we both really craved lemon cakes.

So we looked online and couldn&apost really find any recipes that seemed in our minds to suit that because they&aposre really sort of an ideal food in the books. We made a few recipes that fell kind of short, but we had a lot of fun doing it. And so we decided we would keep on trying to find the perfect lemon-cake recipe, and in the meantime, maybe we would try a pork pie and maybe a stew of some kind.

The whole thing kind of just got out of control, and we decided to blog about it, and we just had a lot of fun doing it. It was very soon that it was too much to stop, so we just kept it up.


Publishers Text

One hundred innovative, nuanced and delightful recipes for seasonal ice creams by the famed Columbus, Ohio, glacier, including such favorites as Salty Caramel (sales are over 200 gallons a week) Thai Peanut with Toasted Coconut and Cayenne pepper Maker's Mark Buttered Pecan Strawberry Buttermilk Ice Cream etc. Also there are recipes for yogurt (Grapefruit Hibiscus Lime Cardamom, and more) and sorbets (Riesling Poached Pear Cherry Lambic, and more), plus frozen desserts such as ice cream sandwiches, baked Alaskas, and sundaes.