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No Whining About Wine Gifts

No Whining About Wine Gifts


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Finding the right wine gift can be a challenge regardless of who's actually been naughty or nice. There are different price ranges for everyone you need to buy gifts for, never mind that everyone on your list might have a different level of wine knowledge or appreciation.

With that, The Daily Sip brings you holiday gift suggestions for all the important wine drinkers on your shopping list:

The Wine Newbie: Wine for Dummies
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Updated in 2009 yet intelligently written on its first run, this book is as good as it gets for anyone with no--or even a decent amount of--wine knowledge. It's perhaps the only book in the entire Dummies series that's worth admitting you bought--and keeping on hand. Buy it here.

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Select Liquors

Many people to shop for this holiday season...and no one worthy of a bottle of Dom? Buy great products at absolutely rock bottom prices at Select Liquors.

Parents: A pretty decanter

No gift shows respect for your elders like an object that's shiny and fragile. Add practicality to the mix, and you get some serious brownie points. A beautiful decanter is the perfect purchase for any wine-loving parent. Find one here.

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B Wise Vineyards: Artisan wines, direct from the source

Our philosophy: Drink and share great wine. Wine is always better when shared. Even better is when you pair good food and good times with our distinctive, bold-flavored, limited-production reds from our top vineyards in Napa and Sonoma. That's the first step toward wine wisdom. Learn more at BWiseVineyards.com. Exclusive special for Bottlenotes members: 20% off our signature Red Blend. Use Code: BottleNotes2010.

The iBanker Who Has Everything: A limited-edition Champagne

If money's no object when you're buying for someone who makes it in his or her sleep, go with a limited-edition Champagne. All the big-name, recognizable producers make special labels that, when gifted, show you put some extra effort into the purchase. Our pick: The Andy Warhol edition of Dom Perignon 2002. Find it here.

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Personalized Wood Wine Boxes: Great Gift Pairing

Looking for a thoughtful and creative holiday gift? LaserCraft Gifts offers personalized Baltic Birch wooden wine boxes that will dazzle everyone. Your content may include names, logos, quotes/sayings, dates and photos. Plan ahead for this classic gift; one that will display your thoughtfulness. Available in single-, 2-, 3- and 6-bottle designs. Think outside the bottle for your next wine gift. Click here to view some examples.

Mother-In-Law: Something that'll keep her busy

The best thing you can get to keep someone off your back is a big, fat, captivating book. No wine book is more thorough than Jancis Robinson's Oxford Companion to Wine. Sure, it's mostly for reference, but it's written in an approachable manner that makes you want to jump around its 800 pages, constantly absorbing wine knowledge. Any wine-loving mother-in-law would be lost in this book for weeks. Find it here.


Whine? Not! Four Ways to Deal with Whining Children

We've got advice about teaching your preschooler to find less annoying ways to get what she wants.

I have to say, my daughter, Avery, is already somewhat of an overachiever. She always runs when she could walk, she routinely gobbles down her dinner so she can finish before everyone else at the table, and she insists on climbing higher than all the kids on the jungle gym (luckily, I have a strong stomach). But I&aposd be remiss not to include this less-than-desirable distinction: Avery is also a world-class whiner, griping at a jaw-dropping pitch for such lengths that she can easily outdo any other 4-year-old in a single squawk session.

Avery&aposs impassioned approach to life is refreshing, but her overzealous whining? Not so much. Whether she&aposs begging for a brownie or pining for a new pet, her tenacious requests try my nerves. However, my mind -- and my eardrums -- were put to rest by some expert reassurance: "Whining is totally normal," says Janeen Hayward, a licensed clinical professional counselor and founder of Swellbeing, a parenting resource in New York City. Virtually all kids become pros at the shrill mewling that serves as a desperate plea for something (usually an item they know they can&apost have) and yet also expresses a feeling of powerlessness that crying or talking doesn&apost. "Three- and 4-year- olds whine frequently because they have big expectations and desires, but don&apost always get their way or have the ability to do the task at hand," explains Hayward.

Sure, it&aposs comforting to confirm that Avery is simply expressing her needs like the rest of her pals. But it&aposs also frustrating to realize that such an annoying behavior is so incredibly effective. The second she begins howling, I usually fulfill her request no matter how outrageous it is (chocolate milk in bed!), simply to stop the noise and save my sanity. Of course, I&aposm only making the problem worse. "When you give in to your child&aposs demands immediately, you&aposre reinforcing her behavior," Hayward points out. Ready to wipe out the gripes? Use these tips to win the war on whining.


Whine? Not! Four Ways to Deal with Whining Children

We've got advice about teaching your preschooler to find less annoying ways to get what she wants.

I have to say, my daughter, Avery, is already somewhat of an overachiever. She always runs when she could walk, she routinely gobbles down her dinner so she can finish before everyone else at the table, and she insists on climbing higher than all the kids on the jungle gym (luckily, I have a strong stomach). But I&aposd be remiss not to include this less-than-desirable distinction: Avery is also a world-class whiner, griping at a jaw-dropping pitch for such lengths that she can easily outdo any other 4-year-old in a single squawk session.

Avery&aposs impassioned approach to life is refreshing, but her overzealous whining? Not so much. Whether she&aposs begging for a brownie or pining for a new pet, her tenacious requests try my nerves. However, my mind -- and my eardrums -- were put to rest by some expert reassurance: "Whining is totally normal," says Janeen Hayward, a licensed clinical professional counselor and founder of Swellbeing, a parenting resource in New York City. Virtually all kids become pros at the shrill mewling that serves as a desperate plea for something (usually an item they know they can&apost have) and yet also expresses a feeling of powerlessness that crying or talking doesn&apost. "Three- and 4-year- olds whine frequently because they have big expectations and desires, but don&apost always get their way or have the ability to do the task at hand," explains Hayward.

Sure, it&aposs comforting to confirm that Avery is simply expressing her needs like the rest of her pals. But it&aposs also frustrating to realize that such an annoying behavior is so incredibly effective. The second she begins howling, I usually fulfill her request no matter how outrageous it is (chocolate milk in bed!), simply to stop the noise and save my sanity. Of course, I&aposm only making the problem worse. "When you give in to your child&aposs demands immediately, you&aposre reinforcing her behavior," Hayward points out. Ready to wipe out the gripes? Use these tips to win the war on whining.


Whine? Not! Four Ways to Deal with Whining Children

We've got advice about teaching your preschooler to find less annoying ways to get what she wants.

I have to say, my daughter, Avery, is already somewhat of an overachiever. She always runs when she could walk, she routinely gobbles down her dinner so she can finish before everyone else at the table, and she insists on climbing higher than all the kids on the jungle gym (luckily, I have a strong stomach). But I&aposd be remiss not to include this less-than-desirable distinction: Avery is also a world-class whiner, griping at a jaw-dropping pitch for such lengths that she can easily outdo any other 4-year-old in a single squawk session.

Avery&aposs impassioned approach to life is refreshing, but her overzealous whining? Not so much. Whether she&aposs begging for a brownie or pining for a new pet, her tenacious requests try my nerves. However, my mind -- and my eardrums -- were put to rest by some expert reassurance: "Whining is totally normal," says Janeen Hayward, a licensed clinical professional counselor and founder of Swellbeing, a parenting resource in New York City. Virtually all kids become pros at the shrill mewling that serves as a desperate plea for something (usually an item they know they can&apost have) and yet also expresses a feeling of powerlessness that crying or talking doesn&apost. "Three- and 4-year- olds whine frequently because they have big expectations and desires, but don&apost always get their way or have the ability to do the task at hand," explains Hayward.

Sure, it&aposs comforting to confirm that Avery is simply expressing her needs like the rest of her pals. But it&aposs also frustrating to realize that such an annoying behavior is so incredibly effective. The second she begins howling, I usually fulfill her request no matter how outrageous it is (chocolate milk in bed!), simply to stop the noise and save my sanity. Of course, I&aposm only making the problem worse. "When you give in to your child&aposs demands immediately, you&aposre reinforcing her behavior," Hayward points out. Ready to wipe out the gripes? Use these tips to win the war on whining.


Whine? Not! Four Ways to Deal with Whining Children

We've got advice about teaching your preschooler to find less annoying ways to get what she wants.

I have to say, my daughter, Avery, is already somewhat of an overachiever. She always runs when she could walk, she routinely gobbles down her dinner so she can finish before everyone else at the table, and she insists on climbing higher than all the kids on the jungle gym (luckily, I have a strong stomach). But I&aposd be remiss not to include this less-than-desirable distinction: Avery is also a world-class whiner, griping at a jaw-dropping pitch for such lengths that she can easily outdo any other 4-year-old in a single squawk session.

Avery&aposs impassioned approach to life is refreshing, but her overzealous whining? Not so much. Whether she&aposs begging for a brownie or pining for a new pet, her tenacious requests try my nerves. However, my mind -- and my eardrums -- were put to rest by some expert reassurance: "Whining is totally normal," says Janeen Hayward, a licensed clinical professional counselor and founder of Swellbeing, a parenting resource in New York City. Virtually all kids become pros at the shrill mewling that serves as a desperate plea for something (usually an item they know they can&apost have) and yet also expresses a feeling of powerlessness that crying or talking doesn&apost. "Three- and 4-year- olds whine frequently because they have big expectations and desires, but don&apost always get their way or have the ability to do the task at hand," explains Hayward.

Sure, it&aposs comforting to confirm that Avery is simply expressing her needs like the rest of her pals. But it&aposs also frustrating to realize that such an annoying behavior is so incredibly effective. The second she begins howling, I usually fulfill her request no matter how outrageous it is (chocolate milk in bed!), simply to stop the noise and save my sanity. Of course, I&aposm only making the problem worse. "When you give in to your child&aposs demands immediately, you&aposre reinforcing her behavior," Hayward points out. Ready to wipe out the gripes? Use these tips to win the war on whining.


Whine? Not! Four Ways to Deal with Whining Children

We've got advice about teaching your preschooler to find less annoying ways to get what she wants.

I have to say, my daughter, Avery, is already somewhat of an overachiever. She always runs when she could walk, she routinely gobbles down her dinner so she can finish before everyone else at the table, and she insists on climbing higher than all the kids on the jungle gym (luckily, I have a strong stomach). But I&aposd be remiss not to include this less-than-desirable distinction: Avery is also a world-class whiner, griping at a jaw-dropping pitch for such lengths that she can easily outdo any other 4-year-old in a single squawk session.

Avery&aposs impassioned approach to life is refreshing, but her overzealous whining? Not so much. Whether she&aposs begging for a brownie or pining for a new pet, her tenacious requests try my nerves. However, my mind -- and my eardrums -- were put to rest by some expert reassurance: "Whining is totally normal," says Janeen Hayward, a licensed clinical professional counselor and founder of Swellbeing, a parenting resource in New York City. Virtually all kids become pros at the shrill mewling that serves as a desperate plea for something (usually an item they know they can&apost have) and yet also expresses a feeling of powerlessness that crying or talking doesn&apost. "Three- and 4-year- olds whine frequently because they have big expectations and desires, but don&apost always get their way or have the ability to do the task at hand," explains Hayward.

Sure, it&aposs comforting to confirm that Avery is simply expressing her needs like the rest of her pals. But it&aposs also frustrating to realize that such an annoying behavior is so incredibly effective. The second she begins howling, I usually fulfill her request no matter how outrageous it is (chocolate milk in bed!), simply to stop the noise and save my sanity. Of course, I&aposm only making the problem worse. "When you give in to your child&aposs demands immediately, you&aposre reinforcing her behavior," Hayward points out. Ready to wipe out the gripes? Use these tips to win the war on whining.


Whine? Not! Four Ways to Deal with Whining Children

We've got advice about teaching your preschooler to find less annoying ways to get what she wants.

I have to say, my daughter, Avery, is already somewhat of an overachiever. She always runs when she could walk, she routinely gobbles down her dinner so she can finish before everyone else at the table, and she insists on climbing higher than all the kids on the jungle gym (luckily, I have a strong stomach). But I&aposd be remiss not to include this less-than-desirable distinction: Avery is also a world-class whiner, griping at a jaw-dropping pitch for such lengths that she can easily outdo any other 4-year-old in a single squawk session.

Avery&aposs impassioned approach to life is refreshing, but her overzealous whining? Not so much. Whether she&aposs begging for a brownie or pining for a new pet, her tenacious requests try my nerves. However, my mind -- and my eardrums -- were put to rest by some expert reassurance: "Whining is totally normal," says Janeen Hayward, a licensed clinical professional counselor and founder of Swellbeing, a parenting resource in New York City. Virtually all kids become pros at the shrill mewling that serves as a desperate plea for something (usually an item they know they can&apost have) and yet also expresses a feeling of powerlessness that crying or talking doesn&apost. "Three- and 4-year- olds whine frequently because they have big expectations and desires, but don&apost always get their way or have the ability to do the task at hand," explains Hayward.

Sure, it&aposs comforting to confirm that Avery is simply expressing her needs like the rest of her pals. But it&aposs also frustrating to realize that such an annoying behavior is so incredibly effective. The second she begins howling, I usually fulfill her request no matter how outrageous it is (chocolate milk in bed!), simply to stop the noise and save my sanity. Of course, I&aposm only making the problem worse. "When you give in to your child&aposs demands immediately, you&aposre reinforcing her behavior," Hayward points out. Ready to wipe out the gripes? Use these tips to win the war on whining.


Whine? Not! Four Ways to Deal with Whining Children

We've got advice about teaching your preschooler to find less annoying ways to get what she wants.

I have to say, my daughter, Avery, is already somewhat of an overachiever. She always runs when she could walk, she routinely gobbles down her dinner so she can finish before everyone else at the table, and she insists on climbing higher than all the kids on the jungle gym (luckily, I have a strong stomach). But I&aposd be remiss not to include this less-than-desirable distinction: Avery is also a world-class whiner, griping at a jaw-dropping pitch for such lengths that she can easily outdo any other 4-year-old in a single squawk session.

Avery&aposs impassioned approach to life is refreshing, but her overzealous whining? Not so much. Whether she&aposs begging for a brownie or pining for a new pet, her tenacious requests try my nerves. However, my mind -- and my eardrums -- were put to rest by some expert reassurance: "Whining is totally normal," says Janeen Hayward, a licensed clinical professional counselor and founder of Swellbeing, a parenting resource in New York City. Virtually all kids become pros at the shrill mewling that serves as a desperate plea for something (usually an item they know they can&apost have) and yet also expresses a feeling of powerlessness that crying or talking doesn&apost. "Three- and 4-year- olds whine frequently because they have big expectations and desires, but don&apost always get their way or have the ability to do the task at hand," explains Hayward.

Sure, it&aposs comforting to confirm that Avery is simply expressing her needs like the rest of her pals. But it&aposs also frustrating to realize that such an annoying behavior is so incredibly effective. The second she begins howling, I usually fulfill her request no matter how outrageous it is (chocolate milk in bed!), simply to stop the noise and save my sanity. Of course, I&aposm only making the problem worse. "When you give in to your child&aposs demands immediately, you&aposre reinforcing her behavior," Hayward points out. Ready to wipe out the gripes? Use these tips to win the war on whining.


Whine? Not! Four Ways to Deal with Whining Children

We've got advice about teaching your preschooler to find less annoying ways to get what she wants.

I have to say, my daughter, Avery, is already somewhat of an overachiever. She always runs when she could walk, she routinely gobbles down her dinner so she can finish before everyone else at the table, and she insists on climbing higher than all the kids on the jungle gym (luckily, I have a strong stomach). But I&aposd be remiss not to include this less-than-desirable distinction: Avery is also a world-class whiner, griping at a jaw-dropping pitch for such lengths that she can easily outdo any other 4-year-old in a single squawk session.

Avery&aposs impassioned approach to life is refreshing, but her overzealous whining? Not so much. Whether she&aposs begging for a brownie or pining for a new pet, her tenacious requests try my nerves. However, my mind -- and my eardrums -- were put to rest by some expert reassurance: "Whining is totally normal," says Janeen Hayward, a licensed clinical professional counselor and founder of Swellbeing, a parenting resource in New York City. Virtually all kids become pros at the shrill mewling that serves as a desperate plea for something (usually an item they know they can&apost have) and yet also expresses a feeling of powerlessness that crying or talking doesn&apost. "Three- and 4-year- olds whine frequently because they have big expectations and desires, but don&apost always get their way or have the ability to do the task at hand," explains Hayward.

Sure, it&aposs comforting to confirm that Avery is simply expressing her needs like the rest of her pals. But it&aposs also frustrating to realize that such an annoying behavior is so incredibly effective. The second she begins howling, I usually fulfill her request no matter how outrageous it is (chocolate milk in bed!), simply to stop the noise and save my sanity. Of course, I&aposm only making the problem worse. "When you give in to your child&aposs demands immediately, you&aposre reinforcing her behavior," Hayward points out. Ready to wipe out the gripes? Use these tips to win the war on whining.


Whine? Not! Four Ways to Deal with Whining Children

We've got advice about teaching your preschooler to find less annoying ways to get what she wants.

I have to say, my daughter, Avery, is already somewhat of an overachiever. She always runs when she could walk, she routinely gobbles down her dinner so she can finish before everyone else at the table, and she insists on climbing higher than all the kids on the jungle gym (luckily, I have a strong stomach). But I&aposd be remiss not to include this less-than-desirable distinction: Avery is also a world-class whiner, griping at a jaw-dropping pitch for such lengths that she can easily outdo any other 4-year-old in a single squawk session.

Avery&aposs impassioned approach to life is refreshing, but her overzealous whining? Not so much. Whether she&aposs begging for a brownie or pining for a new pet, her tenacious requests try my nerves. However, my mind -- and my eardrums -- were put to rest by some expert reassurance: "Whining is totally normal," says Janeen Hayward, a licensed clinical professional counselor and founder of Swellbeing, a parenting resource in New York City. Virtually all kids become pros at the shrill mewling that serves as a desperate plea for something (usually an item they know they can&apost have) and yet also expresses a feeling of powerlessness that crying or talking doesn&apost. "Three- and 4-year- olds whine frequently because they have big expectations and desires, but don&apost always get their way or have the ability to do the task at hand," explains Hayward.

Sure, it&aposs comforting to confirm that Avery is simply expressing her needs like the rest of her pals. But it&aposs also frustrating to realize that such an annoying behavior is so incredibly effective. The second she begins howling, I usually fulfill her request no matter how outrageous it is (chocolate milk in bed!), simply to stop the noise and save my sanity. Of course, I&aposm only making the problem worse. "When you give in to your child&aposs demands immediately, you&aposre reinforcing her behavior," Hayward points out. Ready to wipe out the gripes? Use these tips to win the war on whining.


Whine? Not! Four Ways to Deal with Whining Children

We've got advice about teaching your preschooler to find less annoying ways to get what she wants.

I have to say, my daughter, Avery, is already somewhat of an overachiever. She always runs when she could walk, she routinely gobbles down her dinner so she can finish before everyone else at the table, and she insists on climbing higher than all the kids on the jungle gym (luckily, I have a strong stomach). But I&aposd be remiss not to include this less-than-desirable distinction: Avery is also a world-class whiner, griping at a jaw-dropping pitch for such lengths that she can easily outdo any other 4-year-old in a single squawk session.

Avery&aposs impassioned approach to life is refreshing, but her overzealous whining? Not so much. Whether she&aposs begging for a brownie or pining for a new pet, her tenacious requests try my nerves. However, my mind -- and my eardrums -- were put to rest by some expert reassurance: "Whining is totally normal," says Janeen Hayward, a licensed clinical professional counselor and founder of Swellbeing, a parenting resource in New York City. Virtually all kids become pros at the shrill mewling that serves as a desperate plea for something (usually an item they know they can&apost have) and yet also expresses a feeling of powerlessness that crying or talking doesn&apost. "Three- and 4-year- olds whine frequently because they have big expectations and desires, but don&apost always get their way or have the ability to do the task at hand," explains Hayward.

Sure, it&aposs comforting to confirm that Avery is simply expressing her needs like the rest of her pals. But it&aposs also frustrating to realize that such an annoying behavior is so incredibly effective. The second she begins howling, I usually fulfill her request no matter how outrageous it is (chocolate milk in bed!), simply to stop the noise and save my sanity. Of course, I&aposm only making the problem worse. "When you give in to your child&aposs demands immediately, you&aposre reinforcing her behavior," Hayward points out. Ready to wipe out the gripes? Use these tips to win the war on whining.


Watch the video: Kids Tell Man What to Say on a Blind Date. No Whining. HiHo Kids (June 2022).


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